Quick, Homemade BBQ Sauce

Posted by on September 2, 2010 | 11 Comments

Don’t forget about the new FREE eCookbook with 125 healthy recipes for kid and adult palates alike!

Wow, I am very proud to say that Smart School Time Recipes was downloaded by over 6000 viewers yesterday! It seems to be on track for thousands of additional downloads today and hopefully in the future. Please help to spread the word of feeding ourselves and our kids with whole foods (rather than over-processed packages of Franken-foods) by emailing, sharing, and tweeting about this new Free eCookbook. You can send them to this link – http://www.onefrugalfoodie.com/2010/09/01/free-school-time-recipes/. Change through recipes and food ideas; that’s my motto.

I was actually going to post my version of one of the recipes in that eCookbook today, but I realized we are coming upon a major barbecue weekend. A northern hemisphere going away party for the summer if you will. So I’m saving the Smart School Time recipe for next week, and sharing my new go-to homemade BBQ sauce today.

All summer long, my husband and I scoured our local stores for good, natural barbecue sauce. I kid you not, we found only one brand that didn’t have high fructose corn syrup (and usually in the first three ingredients no less!); it was Annie’s. I love Annie’s Homegrown. They are a great little natural food company – but, I’m sorry, their barbecue sauce is the pits. It’s a spiced up tomato-y concoction with flavors that completely do not meld. I definitely do not recommend.

So when I reviewed American Vegan Kitchen and saw the Chipotle BBQ Portobello recipe with homemade barbecue sauce, I thought, “Why not? What have I got to lose?” It is awesome.

homemade chipotle bbq sauce

Tamasin’s version is way, way, WAY too hot for our taste buds, so I have toned my version down a lot. It does use ketchup as a base, but you can use Hunt’s (for the super bargain bbq sauce – this stuff is cheap and no longer contains high fructose corn syrup) or a good quality agave-sweetened brand like Organicville.

I’ve included two versions below: an instant non-fat version (we use this when the sauce will be simmering in a crockpot anyway) or the slightly richer simmered version (still takes just 15 minutes and is low in fat).

Chipotle BBQ Sauce – Almost Original Recipe

The following recipes are Vegan, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free, Nut-Free, and Soy-Free – but be sure to check the label of the ketchup and worcestershire carefully for ingredient concerns. These are adapted from American Vegan Kitchen.

  • 1 Tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1/4 Cup Finely Minced Onion
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2/3 Cup Ketchup
  • 1 to 3 teaspoons (up to 1 tablespoon) Minced Chipotle Chiles in Adobo Sauce* (omit if you just want a gentle spice)
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Chipotle Chili Powder
  • 1-1/2 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1-1/2 Tablespoons Blackstrap Molasses
  • 1 Teaspoon Liquid Smoke
  • 3/4 Teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Add the onion, and saute for a few minutes, or until soft. Add the garlic and saute for just a minute more. Add the remaining ingredients, bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to simmer. Simmer, uncovered, for about 15 minutes. Check in to stir occasionally. If it gets too thick, feel free to add a little water. Taste and adjust seasonings if desired. 

Chipotle BBQ Sauce – In an Instant

  • 2 Cloves Garlic, minced or 1/8 to 1/4 Teaspoon Garlic Powder (optional)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 Teaspoon Onion Powder
  • 2/3 Cup Ketchup
  • 1 to 3 teaspoons (up to 1 tablespoon) Minced Chipotle Chiles in Adobo Sauce* (omit if you just want a gentle spice)
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Chipotle Chili Powder
  • 1-1/2 Tablespoons Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1-1/2 Tablespoons Blackstrap Molasses
  • 1 Teaspoon Liquid Smoke
  • 3/4 Teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce

Simply stir or blend all ingredients together. For best flavor, add to a dish that is still cooking or in the crockpot to help the flavors meld. But in a pinch, you can use it as is. In that case, adjust seasonings to taste.

*I de-seed the chipotles as much as possible (yes, it’s a little messy, but those seeds can be toooo spicy), and then puree the chipotles in adobo to make it ready-to-use and easy-to-measure. It can be stored this way for a little while in the fridge or freezer.

Both recipes make about 1 cup

homemade chipotle bbq sauce

 

Filed Under: Uncategorized

Gluten-Free Recipe Index

Posted by on January 16, 2011 | 5 Comments

Special Diet Notes

  • All recipes on this blog are dairy-free (that is free of all milk ingredients including lactose and casein), since I am also the founder of this site.
  • All of the recipes below are also gluten-free or have a gluten-free option. If gluten is okay for you, see my complete recipe index.
  • Most of the recipes are soy-free and many of the recipes are also vegan/vegetarian, egg-free, and/or nut-free – I try to note these dietary preferences within each recipe.

Bevies

Breakfast to Brunch

Baking Bread

Veggies & Grains

Meal-Worthy

Sweet Treats and Snacks

Sauce & Seasoning

Go Dairy Free Recipe Variations

If you have a copy of Go Dairy Free, these are recipe variations I have made on recipes within the book.

Contributed Recipes

These are recipes posted here for a bloggie event or otherwise (sent in by someone) that I haven’t trialed myself.

 

Filed Under:

Pulled Pork Potato Planks or Boats

Posted by on October 14, 2009 | 19 Comments

Have you ever driven the Nevada route from Las Vegas to Tahoe? Lets just say it isn’t a foodie haven. When we finally spotted a Safeway (3/4 of the way through the trip) we were overjoyed (yes, it is that pathetic).

Ravenous and cold, we headed for the very petite hot food case to discover a very limited selection … a modest-sized box with just pulled pork in it for six bucks, or two pulled pork sandwiches that appeared loaded with just as much meat as the non-sandwich box for just $.99 each. We really didn’t want those white, fluffy, flavorless buns, but with that price discrepancy, the choice was obvious.

I took off the top bun and had it open-faced (while my husband just ate the pork out of the middle), but it got me thinking, “how else can we enjoy pulled pork?” We both really enjoy this slow-cooked, barbecue-sauced meat, but since cutting bread from our daily diet, we have actually acquired a distaste for the buns it is always served on.  

With several hours left in the car to ponder this thought, it occurred to me that potatoes could possibly be the perfect vessel. It had been years since I had enjoyed potato skins, but couldn’t the bold flavors of pulled pork hold their own (sans cheese) when served in a potato dish? The answer was a resounding yes!

pulled pork potato planks

My batch of pulled pork made so much that we ended up enjoying the potato-pork combo for two full dinners. The first was with with potato boats (pictured below), and for the second I made potato planks (pictured above), read on for my reasoning.

We both loved the potato boats, but I did learn a thing or two. First off, scoop out the potato (reserving it for some yummy soup!), leaving only about 1/4 to 1/2 inch of flesh inside the skins. I left a bit too much of the white stuff on the first go around. Second, if your potatoes are greening, there is no need to throw in the towel. I had two boat-worthy potatoes, but the other two had to be peeled in order to get rid of that toxic greenish layer. So instead of boats, I sliced the peeled potatoes lengthwise (to about 1/4-inch thickness) and made potato planks! My husband actually preferred the planks, but I was quite impartial. The planks were roasted and awesome, but those skins are my favorite part of the whole potato! Either way, delish!

Pulled Pork Potato Boats or Planks

This recipe is Dairy-Free, Nut-Free, and Egg-Free, and it can be Gluten-Free / Grain-Free, and Soy-Free. Though this recipe veres sharply into omnivorous territory, I invite all vegans and vegetarians to use the potato plank idea as a base for your favorite topper … they really are yummy!

  • 2 Large Baking Potatoes (I used Russets)
  • 1 Tablespoon Olive or Grapeseed Oil
  • 1 Large Garlic Clove, crushed (about 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of the jarred stuff)
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Salt
  • Pulled Pork (your favorite recipe or my easy recipe below)
  • Sliced Black Olives, to garnish

For the Boats:

Bake the potatoes in the oven or microwave, if you are in a hurry. Scoop out the white flesh, leaving 1/4 to 1/2 inch of the white stuff (reserve the flesh for another recipe, such as soup or mashed potatoes).

This step is optional for the boats: Combine the oil and garlic in a small dish. Brush the tops and insides of the boats with the oil-garlic mixture. Sprinkle the boats with salt. Place the potatoes in the oven, and broil for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until the boats just begin to brown.

Fill the boats with the pulled pork and top each boat with the sliced olives. If desired, return the boats to the oven and broil them for a minute or two.

On the first go around, we simply scooped out the potato flesh, piled the pork in, and ate. But after trying the roasted potato planks, I think giving the skins a quick roast is a good optional step to seal in some flavor. 

For the Planks:

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.

Peel your potatoes, if desired or required. Slice the potatoes lengthwise, so they are about 1/4 to 1/2 inch in width. You should end up with about 6 or so long, flat “planks.”

Place the potatoes on a baking sheet. Combine the oil and garlic, and brush them on the tops and bottoms of your planks. Sprinkle the tops of the the planks with salt.

Bake the potatoes for 15 minutes, flip, and return them to the oven for another 15 minutes. They should just lightly start to brown on both sides.

Top the planks with the pulled pork and garnish with sliced olives. Return them to the oven and continue to bake, or broil, for just a few minutes to make sure everything is heated through and crisped up to your liking.

Yields 2 meal-sized servings or 4 appetizer servings

 

Easy Crockpot Pulled Pork

  • 1-3/4 to 2 lbs Boneless Pork Loin
  • 1 Small to Medium Onion (sweet white or yellow), sliced into small wedges
  • 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce (Lea & Perrins is GF in the U.S., and I believe Edward & Sons is GF)
  • 1 Quart (4 cups) Chicken Broth
  • Water
  • 1 Bottle of Your Favorite Barbecue Sauce (I used an 18-ouncer; choose your BBQ sauce wisely if you have free-from needs)
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Place the pork in your slow cooker. Sprinkle the onions over top, and drizzle on the Worcestershire. Pour in the chicken broth, and add enough water to cover the pork.

Set that baby on low for 8 hours. (I actually left mine for 10, and it was tender and delicious).

Remove the pork from the crockpot and shred it using two forks. Remove the liquid from the crockpot (I reserved mine for use as a broth in other recipes), and return the shredded pork to the crockpot. Pour in the barbecue sauce and stir until it is well combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Note: I hate recipes that don’t tell you how much salt and pepper, but in this case, it really depends on the barbecue sauce you are using. I added 1/4 teaspoon of salt, but next time would increase it a touch and use a bit more fresh ground pepper.

Leave the slow cooker on low or warm, and allow the pork to cook with the sauce for another hour. Your pork is ready!

Yields way more pork than you need for a batch of these jumbo boats …

pulled pork potato boats

 

Want another creative way to enjoy pulled pork? I spotted these pulled pork tamales over at Healthy Delicious.

Do you have any other foodie ideas for serving pulled pork? Or what about another topping idea for those potatoes?

Alisa’s Recipe Index

Posted by on December 27, 2008 | 9 Comments

Special Diet Notes

  • All recipes on this blog are dairy-free (that is free of all milk ingredients including lactose and casein), since I am also the founder of this site.
  • If you are only interested in gluten-free recipes, see my Gluten-Free Recipe Index (all the recipes are still dairy-free).
  • Most of the recipes are soy-free and many of the recipes are also vegan/vegetarian, egg-free, and/or nut-free – I try to note this within each recipe.

Bevies

Breakfast to Brunch

Baking Bread

Veggies & Grains

Meal-Worthy

Sweet Treats and Snacks

Sauce & Seasoning

Go Dairy Free Recipe Variations

If you have a copy of Go Dairy Free, these are recipe variations I have made on recipes within the book.

Contributed Recipes

These are recipes posted here for a bloggie event or otherwise (sent in by someone) that I haven’t trialed myself.

 

Filed Under:

A New Staple: Veggie Burger Salads

Posted by on August 14, 2007 | 3 Comments

If you have read my review on Amy’s (vegan) Veggie Burgers, then you already know how the veggie burger bug caught on in our household.  To summarize, after we ran out of hamburger buns, I took AllergicGirl‘s burger salad lead and whipped up some lunchtime veggie burger salads.  My husband liked them so much, that he has begun requesting these meat-free salads a couple of times a week.  He stated how much lighter and better he felt after eating them.  The words “we might want to try out a vegan diet for a little while,” even left his lips.  I was truly speechless.  While we have not yet made the full conversion, meat is definitely making less of an appearance each week, acting more like a “garnish” than the base of the meal. 

So… I couldn’t resist continuing the veggie burger trials.  With a $1.00 off coupon for Dr. Praeger’s Veggie Burgers (from the Mambo Sprouts coupon book), I picked up the Tex Mex variety at my local Trader Joe’s yesterday.  End price was $2.29 for the four patties.  Of course, with all of the wonderful things I have heard about the Trader Joe’s brand Masala Veggie Burgers ($2.49), I couldn’t resist throwing those into the cart as well. 

Masala Veggie Burger

We arrived at home with bags full of groceries, yet when I offered my husband a veggie burger salad, he responded “that sounds great!”  I opted for the Masala burgers first, lightly cooked in some coconut oil (you could use whatever oil you like) on the stovetop for about five minutes.  I chopped them up, and sprinkled the bites atop a bed of arugala along with chickpeas (garbanzos) and mushrooms on my husband’s salad, and chickpeas, carrots, and green onions atop mine.

Masala Veggie Burger

The burgers were good, they were full of flavor and had a nice warm spice that added some interest.  They were quite different from the other burgers we have tried, as these had a definite mashed potato base.  They held their own, not too soft and squishy, but my husband said he still preferred the Amy’s brand.  I was also a bit disappointed to discover that canola oil was the second ingredient, since this is a common GMO oil, and there are so many better options.  While these might go well bun-style, I think they may be a bit too soft.  Nonetheless, if you do opt for these during a barbecue, I would dress the bun with nothing more than some mayonnaise or vegannaise, as they have a wonderful Indian spice flavor that should not be overpowered.

Today I busted open the Tex Mex Veggie Burgers from Dr. Praeger’s.  First comment, they really could use some packaging consulting.  Well, the packaging itself was great, individual servings, resealable box, etc…. but the name “Dr. Praeger’s” coupled with a very frumpy looking, frowning doc pictured on the back, plus a less than stellar use of overall color kept me from even considering these veggie burgers in the past.  It was the coupon in the end that enticed me.

Dr. Praeger's

Really, these seemed to be the veggie burgers I was looking for.  They are non-GMO, wheat-free (contain oat bran and oat fiber, and made in a facility that handles wheat) and really they were mostly veggie based, no textured soy protein in site.  In fact, whole little bits of vegetables and black beans dotted these “burgers.”  I did like the tex mex flavor, which was rather sedated, calm, and influential, lacking the barbecue sauce flavor of Amy’s Texas version.  They were generally tasty, yet something was keeping me from shouting, “wow.”  I think my husband stated it best when he said that the Amy’s veggie burgers taste richer.  I really wished some avocados had been on hand, as I think some sliced avocado along with our black beans and green onions atop some greens would have enhanced these burgers quite a bit, adding a touch of indulgence … but really, at $1.50 per avocado, I was definitely holding out for the season!

Dr. Praeger's

Considering they are also made with organic ingredients, I think the Amy’s brand is still on top in our household.  More specifically, we voted for the Quarter Pounder for actual veggie burgers (bun and all) and for the Californian and Bistro (gluten-free) burgers for general veggie burger and salad chomping.

Of course, true to my frugal nature, next on the horizon is making homemade veggie burgers!  In fact, I almost turned the falafels into a burger style.  It seems I was preparing.  There are two veggie burger recipes in Vegan Vittles.  I plan to give one of these a shot, but am still on the lookout for a more veggie-based, or even a mushroom-based burger.  Let me know if you have seen a good one!

 

Filed Under: Tips, Ideas, and Deals

BSI Recipe: Sweet Asian Sunflower Slaw

Posted by on April 25, 2010 | 7 Comments

Wow, did I have a heck of a time coming up with sunflower seed recipes that I was happy with! You can read about my many trials here, but I did finally settle on a couple of recipes for the BSI submission. Here is one of them …

asian slaw

My husband was cooking up a barbecue-style lunch, so I thought a little slaw might go nicely. But to mix things up, I forgoed the mayo for a sunflower seed base and used some Asian ingredients for a different flavor. The end result was pretty tasty, but you can adjust the seasonings to your own personal tastes since there are so few ingredients.

asian sunflower seed slaw

Sweet Asian Sunflower Slaw

This recipe is Vegan / Vegetarian, Dairy-Free, Egg-Free, Nut-Free, Refined Sugar-Free, optionally Gluten-Free, and optionally Soy-Free.

  • 1/4 Cup Sunflower Seeds plus extra for sprinkling
  • 2 Tablespoons Rice Vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Maple Syrup
  • 2 Teaspoons Soy Sauce or Wheat-Free Tamari (for gluten-free) (use coconut aminos or chickpea tamari for soy-free)
  • 1 Teaspoon Sesame Oil
  • 1/8 Teaspoon Ground Ginger (optional)
  • 1 Bag Coleslaw Mix
  • 1 Large Carrot, thinly sliced or grated

Grind the sunflower seeds in a spice grinder until they turn into a powder. Place the ground seeds in a medium-size bowl, and whisk in the vinegar, maple, soy, sesame oil, and ginger until smooth. If you leave it to sit, the mixture will thicken more as the seeds absorb the moisture. Taste test, and adjust seasonings as you wish (soy for salty, maple for sweet, vinegar for tangy, and oil for richness).

Add as much of the coleslaw mix as you like (I used about 2/3 of the bag) and garnish with the carrot. If you aren’t into garnishing, just mix that grated carrot right in.

Yields 3 to 4 sides of slaw

asian sunflower seed slaw

For more of my recipes see Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook and my new blog, Dairy-Free & Fit.

 

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